Welcome the Flintlock Theatre - an original theatre company in Oxford

Honorary Patron: Ian Ricketts

SOVEREIGN NATION [Artist Exchange 2019-20]

Sovereign Nation is part of New Conversations, a programme funded and delivered by the British Council, Farnham Maltings, and the High Commission of Canada in the UK. The fund is designed to encourage and support the development of creative exchange, collaboration and partnerships between artists and arts organisations in the performing arts sector in the UK and Canada. Click here to see the videos we're posting about the project and find out about out free masterclass weekend for ages 15-19.

NO DOGS [Touring Autumn 2020]

"No Blacks. No Irish. No Dogs. That’s what the signs said. And here we are, fifty years later. 

I’m Jamaican. You’re Irish. Both British. But ain’t got no home anywhere. Not anywhere."


Two families arrive in London in 1960, one Jamaican, one Irish, in search of streets they were promised were paved with gold. Winston and Audrey dream of jobs in the city, a house in the suburbs, and a white picket fence; Dermot wants to be free of the Catholic Church and Bridget mostly just wants to go home. Thrown into one another’s lives by circumstance, the Grants, the O’Connnors and their offspring dream big, work hard and do the best they can in this great new Britain. But will it be all they dreamt of? And when a racist backlash begins, will their hard-fought Britishness be worth all that’s lost?


No Dogs is based on interviews with members of Afro-Caribbean and Irish communities accross the South East. Featuring an evocative soundrack and Flintlock’s inventive, high-energy storytelling, No Dogs explores what it means to leave, what it means to arrive, and asks: who is allowed to become truly British, and, when we look for home, where can we find it?


Tour Pack

DAILY BREAD - Touring soon...

Robin is baking. Combining flour, water and salt, with a little help from some friendly microbes, he’ll repeat a process used around the world for over 6,000 years. Until 1961, that is, when a new industrialised process sped things up and stripped bread of much of its nutritional value. Mass-produced loaves became the norm and people forgot how to bake. Now diet culture rules, faddism and myths abound, and body-shaming is the last socially acceptable prejudice. 


As a natural loaf forms beneath his hands, Robin probes pseudoscience and interrogates our relationship with food. With a handful of songs, the occasional attempted rap, and a little help from his friends (plus an unexpected psychic nutritionist), he asks: what exactly do we want from our daily bread? 


Further Dates TBC